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Apples PhoenixCE diagnostic software left on customer MacBook Pro

https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/10/10/apples-phoenixce-diagnostic-software-left-on-customer-macbook-pro

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An Apple customer who bought a Certified Refurbished MacBook Pro claims to have discovered the presence of diagnostic tools on the notebook, applications used to check the MacBook is fully functional but are meant to be removed before being sold.

A refurbished MacBook Pro running PhoenixCE (via BickNlinko/Reddit)

A refurbished MacBook Pro running PhoenixCE (via BickNlinko/Reddit)

In a post to Reddit’s /r/Sysadmin subreddit, user “BickNlinko” writes they had “just bought a certified refurb MacBook Pro and it came with all Apple’s diagnostic stuff.” As part of the post, they included a photograph of the MacBook Pro display, showing the tool along with a warning related to a network connection.

The person goes on to advise they called Apple support to alert them to it and “to see if they would freak out.” After getting through to a supervisor, they were told to “boot in into the recovery mode and do a fresh install of the OS,” with “BickNlinko” adding “They didn’t seem to care very much.

The notebook’s new owner also coyly claims “I may or may not have made images of the two disks” containing the diagnostic tools.

An AppleInsider source within Apple corporate not authorized to speak on behalf of the company said to us that “our internal diagnostic tools sometimes accidentally escape the depot. They pose no security threat to users, and are mostly useless outside of Apple testing facilities.”

The last time anybody on the AppleInsider staff used or saw the “Phoenix” suite of software was several years ago. Even then, during the testing process, the software would have to connect to either a hardware dongle or data stored on a LAN —not WAN —to complete testing on any given model.

Eradication of the testing software is a required step prior to returning a repair to a user, and there is a specific procedure that is followed to ensure compliance. Obviously, those steps were skipped, resulting in the leak of the software.

This is not the first time Apple’s diagnostic tools have surfaced in public, with forum posts occasionally cropping up querying its presence. For example, in 2012 a MacBook Air with the software wouldn’t shut down because PhoenixCE continued to run and wouldn’t quit.

Within the Reddit post, YouTube Apple personality and critic of Apple’s repair policies Louis Rossmann asks the MacBook Pro owner if they have any services they would like performed on the machine, including cleaning and upgrades, and suggesting they get in contact. While Rossman doesn’t directly explain why he offers this, it is likely an attempt to get a closer look at the software, as well as any other tools Apple may have left on the MacBook.

Technology

Slack calls are having ‘connectivity issues’

Slack has confirmed that “Slack Calls are experiencing some connectivity difficulties right now.” The company said it is working to resolve the issue “as quickly as possible.” The difficulties coincide with the push from tech companies to move workers to remote-only meetings and conference calls, amid the outbreak of COVID-19. Slack did not comment on…

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Slack calls are having ‘connectivity issues’

Slack has confirmed that “Slack Calls are experiencing some connectivity difficulties right now.” The company said it is working to resolve the issue “as quickly as possible.” The difficulties coincide with the push from tech companies to move workers to remote-only meetings and conference calls, amid the outbreak of COVID-19.

Slack did not comment on any correlation between the two, or identify what factors are behind the connectivity issues.

Hey @SlackHQ @SlackStatus there’s definitely something up with calls. Everyone keeps getting randomly disconnected, but not all the way. Screen goes black and it just starts randomly playing connect and disconnect sounds.

— matt.js (@mattisadev) March 11, 2020

In a previous blog post outlining Slack’s response to COVID-19, it said “our system architecture is designed to automatically accommodate the surges of traffic throughout the day that this brings to our systems.” The company said its server capacity can handle the demands, as well as the various regions from which users may be logging in. Slack also outlined how the shift to remote may not add a crazy load to its systems.

“The demands on our infrastructure do not change when employees shift away from working together in the same office; there is no difference in load on our systems whether people are connecting from their office, a cellular network, or their homes.”

It added that employees already use an average of nine hours per day, so the volume remains the same.

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Establishing an emergency relief fund, Amazon commits to two-week pay for workers affected by COVID-19

Amazon has instituted a new policy which will see all Amazon employees diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine receiving up to two-weeks of pay. The additional pay is to “ensure employees have the time they need to return to good health without the worry of lost pay,” the company said in a statement. That…

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Establishing an emergency relief fund, Amazon commits to two-week pay for workers affected by COVID-19

Amazon has instituted a new policy which will see all Amazon employees diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine receiving up to two-weeks of pay.

The additional pay is to “ensure employees have the time they need to return to good health without the worry of lost pay,” the company said in a statement.

That pay is in addition to unlimited paid time off for all hourly employees through the end of March, which the company announced as a policy to its workers last week.

The company also said it was setting up a relief fund with a $25 million contribution to support delivery service partners and drivers along with Amazon Flex participants and seasonal employees.

“We will be offering all of these groups the ability to apply for grants approximately equal to up to two weeks of pay if diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine by the government or Amazon,” the company said.

The fund will also support employees and contractors who face financial hardships due to natural disasters, federal emergencies or personal hardship, the company said.

Amazon affiliated workers can apply to receive grant funding ranging from $400 to $5,000 per person.

With this initiative Amazon builds on the commitments it has made as one of several tech companies helping to financially support individuals impacted by the outbreak.

Uber, Salesforce, CiscoMicrosoftLyftSquareTwitterFacebook, Google, and Apple, have all made commitments to pay hourly and other contingent workers impacted the COVID-19 outbreak. Yesterday, Google announced that it had set up a COVID-19 fund as well.

“As we’re in a transition period in the U.S.—and to cover any gaps elsewhere in the world—Google is establishing a COVID-19 fund that will enable all our temporary staff and vendors, globally, to take paid sick leave if they have potential symptoms of COVID-19, or can’t come into work because they’re quarantined,” writes Adrienne Crowther, Google’s director of workplace services.

“Working with our partners, this fund will mean that members of our extended workforce will be compensated for their normal working hours if they can’t come into work for these reasons. We are carefully monitoring the situation and will continue to assess any adjustments needed over the coming months.”

In addition, Microsoft, Amazon and other Seattle-area companies are partnering with nonprofits and governments to launch a relief fund in response to the outbreak. Amazon and Microsoft committed $1 million apiece to this fund. Microsoft said it would also match employee donations to causes aiding in response to COVID-19.

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Technology

Superpeer raises $2M to help influencers and experts make money with one-on-one video calls

Superpeer is giving YouTube creators and other experts a new way to make money. The startup announced today that it has raised $2 million in pre-seed funding led by Eniac Ventures, with participation from angel investors including Steven Schlafman, Ankur Nagpal, Julia Lipton, Patrick Finnegan, Justin De Guzman, Chris Lu, Paul Yacoubian and Cheryl Sew…

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Superpeer raises $2M to help influencers and experts make money with one-on-one video calls

Superpeer is giving YouTube creators and other experts a new way to make money.

The startup announced today that it has raised $2 million in pre-seed funding led by Eniac Ventures, with participation from angel investors including Steven Schlafman, Ankur Nagpal, Julia Lipton, Patrick Finnegan, Justin De Guzman, Chris Lu, Paul Yacoubian and Cheryl Sew Hoy. It also launched on ProductHunt.

The idea is that if you’re watching a video to learn how to paint, or how to code, or about whatever the topic might be, there’s a good chance you have follow-up questions — maybe a lot of them. Ditto if you follow someone on Twitter, or read their blog posts, to learn more about a specific subject.

Now you could try to submit a question or two via tweet or comment section, but you’re probably not going to get any in-depth interaction — and that’s if they respond. You could also try to schedule a “Can I pick your brain?”-type coffee meeting, but again, the odds aren’t in your favor, particularly when it comes to picking the brain of someone famous or highly in-demand.

With Superpeer, experts who are interested in sharing their knowledge can do so via remote, one-on-one video calls. They upload an intro video, the times that they want to be available for calls and how much they want to charge for their time. Then Superpeer handles the appointments (integrating directly with the expert’s calendar), the calls and the payments, adding a 15% fee on top.

So a YouTube creator could start adding a message at the end of their videos directing fans who want to learn more to their Superpeer page. And if you’re a founder who wants to talk to an experienced designer, executive coach, product manager, marketing/sales expert, VC or other founder, you could start with this list.

Of course, there might be some wariness on both sides, whether you’re an expert who doesn’t want to get stuck on the phone with someone creepy or annoying, or someone who doesn’t want to pay for a call that turns out to be a complete waste of time.

To address this, co-founder and CEO Devrim Yasar (who previously founded collaborative programming startup Koding) said the company has created a user rating system, as well as a way to ask for a refund if you feel that a call violated the terms of service — the calls will be recorded and stored for 48 hours for this purpose.

Superpeer launched in private beta two weeks ago, and Yasar said the startup already has more than 100 Superpeers signed up.

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