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How to use Sign In With Apple and manage your log in information

https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/11/07/how-to-use-sign-in-with-apple-and-manage-your-log-in-information

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Sign In With Apple is here, and great for convenience and your privacy. Here’s how to use the feature, and how you can manage the login information.

Craig Federighi introduces Sign In With Apple at WWDC 2019

Craig Federighi introduces Sign In With Apple at WWDC 2019

The first thing you have to do to make use of Sign In With Apple, is to find any apps or sites that use it. It’s fair to say that Apple’s replacement for signing in with Google or Facebook has yet to catch on across the web, but when you do get to use it, it’s very good.

Apple has just updated its support documentation to detail how you manage the sites and apps that you’ve used this service on. If you don’t have any now, you will later, though, because it’s sufficiently good that you’ll use Apple rather than Google or Facebook any time you can.

That’s because the process is as quick as those, and we all click through signing up via Facebook because it’s less of a hassle than creating a new login based on our email address. And it’s easier than thinking of a new password.

Aside from the speed, though, Apple’s sign in function is better than the existing alternatives because it gives you control over what happens next.

Rather than blindly giving your Facebook ID over to a third-party website, you can choose whether they get any real ID at all. While you can go right ahead and sign in with your regular Apple ID email, you can as easily hide this real email address.

With one click you can choose to use your genuine email address or have Apple create one for you

With one click you can choose to use your genuine email address or have Apple create one for you

If you do that, Apple creates a fake address for you to give to the site —and by default, makes that fake address automatically forward to your real one.

How to use Sign In With Apple

To do this, you go through some steps that are vastly faster to click through than to describe. On the Mac, the process for signing up is this:

  • Click on “Continue with Apple” or “Sign In With Apple”
  • Apple displays a popup window explaining the process. Click Continue
  • If you have multiple Apple IDs, choose the one you want to use now
  • Select either Share my Email or Hide my Email
  • Click Continue with Password
  • Your Mac asks for your Apple ID password to confirm it’s you making this sign up request

That’s it, you’re done. On iOS, it’s even faster.

  • Tap “Sign Up” or similar in an app
  • Your iOS device pops up a window asking if you want to Sign In With Apple or us a previous ID
  • Tap on the Apple ID listed
  • Click Apple ID
  • Face ID verifies it’s you

With this done, the site can send you the normal “confirm your account” email. And it can send you any news or marketing email just as it ever could through other sign-ups. But if you decide you don’t want those emails, you can switch them off. The site will keep emailing you, but you’ll never again have to see any of it.

Sign In With Apple works inside iOS apps too

Sign In With Apple works inside iOS apps too

To do that, though, you need to know how to manage your Sign In With Apple settings.

Managing settings

Hand on heart, you would have to think about just where to go to switch off a Google or Facebook sign in. And you know you’d end up having to go to each site or app and separately logging out there.

With Sign In With Apple, you go to settings and turn off any or all you want.

On the Mac, go to System Preferences, click on Apple ID and then on Password & Security.

The first screen gives you a summary of ID, two-factor authentication and so on. If you have used Sign In With Apple anywhere at all, there will be a section called Apps which are using your Apple ID and an Edit button.

Managing your Sign In settings on the Mac

Managing your Sign In settings on the Mac

Click to go through to see the details and you’ll have all the sites and apps listed.

From here you can edit these as you need, or just switch them off.

On iOS, you go to Settings, and tap on your name. Then tap Password & Security to get the same site by site options.

You have to commend Apple for making it as straightforward and simple as it is. But for whatever reason, Sign In With Apple is a long way from being everywhere you want to sign in at.

If you’re just curious to see it in action, try creating an account on the travel site Kayak.com. Oddly, you won’t see the phrase “Sign In With Apple,” though. You’ll just see “Continue with Apple,” right alongside “Continue with Google,” “Facebook,” and “Booking.com.”

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These ten enterprise M&A deals totaled over $40B in 2019

It would be hard to top the 2018 enterprise M&A total of a whopping $87 billion, and predictably this year didn’t come close. In fact, the top 10 enterprise M&A deals in 2019 were less than half last year’s, totaling $40.6 billion. This year’s biggest purchase was Salesforce buying Tableau for $15.7 billion, which would…

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These ten enterprise M&A deals totaled over $40B in 2019

It would be hard to top the 2018 enterprise M&A total of a whopping $87 billion, and predictably this year didn’t come close. In fact, the top 10 enterprise M&A deals in 2019 were less than half last year’s, totaling $40.6 billion.

This year’s biggest purchase was Salesforce buying Tableau for $15.7 billion, which would have been good for third place last year behind IBM’s mega deal plucking Red Hat for $34 billion and Broadcom grabbing CA Technologies for $18.8 billion.

Contributing to this year’s quieter activity was the fact that several typically acquisitive companies — Adobe, Oracle and IBM — stayed mostly on the sidelines after big investments last year. It’s not unusual for companies to take a go-slow approach after a big expenditure year. Adobe and Oracle bought just two companies each with neither revealing the prices. IBM didn’t buy any.

Microsoft didn’t show up on this year’s list either, but still managed to pick up eight new companies. It was just that none was large enough to make the list (or even for them to publicly reveal the prices). When a publicly traded company doesn’t reveal the price, it usually means that it didn’t reach the threshold of being material to the company’s results.

As always, just because you buy it doesn’t mean it’s always going to integrate smoothly or well, and we won’t know about the success or failure of these transactions for some years to come. For now, we can only look at the deals themselves.

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Jumia, DHL, and Alibaba will face off in African ecommerce 2.0

The business of selling consumer goods and services online is a relatively young endeavor across Africa, but ecommerce is set to boom. Over the last eight years, the sector has seen its first phase of big VC fundings, startup duels and attrition. To date, scaling e-commerce in Africa has straddled the line of challenge and…

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Jumia, DHL, and Alibaba will face off in African ecommerce 2.0

The business of selling consumer goods and services online is a relatively young endeavor across Africa, but ecommerce is set to boom.

Over the last eight years, the sector has seen its first phase of big VC fundings, startup duels and attrition.

To date, scaling e-commerce in Africa has straddled the line of challenge and opportunity, perhaps more than any other market in the world. Across major African economies, many of the requisites for online retail — internet access, digital payment adoption, and 3PL delivery options — have been severely lacking.

Still, startups jumped into this market for the chance to digitize a share of Africa’s fast growing consumer spending, expected to top $2 billion by 2025.

African e-commerce 2.0 will include some old and new players, play out across more countries, place more priority on internet services, and see the entry of China.

But before highlighting several things to look out for in the future of digital-retail on the continent, a look back is beneficial.

Jumia vs. Konga

The early years for development of African online shopping largely played out in Nigeria (and to some extent South Africa). Anyone who visited Nigeria from 2012 to 2016 likely saw evidence of one of the continent’s early e-commerce showdowns. Nigeria had its own Coke vs. Pepsi-like duel — a race between ventures Konga and Jumia to out-advertise and out-discount each other in a quest to scale online shopping in Africa’s largest economy and most populous nation.

Traveling in Lagos traffic, large billboards for each startup faced off across the skyline, as their delivery motorcycles buzzed between stopped cars.

Covering each company early on, it appeared a battle of VC attrition. The challenge: who could continue to raise enough capital to absorb the losses of simultaneously capturing and creating an e-commerce market in notoriously difficult conditions.

In addition to the aforementioned challenges, Nigeria also had (and continues to have) shoddy electricity.

Both Konga — founded by Nigerian Sim Shagaya — and Jumia — originally founded by two Nigerians and two Frenchman — were forced to burn capital building fulfillment operations most e-commerce startups source to third parties.

That included their own delivery and payment services (KongaPay and JumiaPay). In addition to sales of goods from mobile-phones to diapers, both startups also began experimenting with verticals for internet based services, such as food-delivery and classifieds.

While Jumia and Konga were competing in Nigeria, there was another VC driven race for e-commerce playing out in South Africa — the continent’s second largest and most advanced economy.

E-tailers Takealot and Kalahari had been jockeying for market share since 2011 after raising capital in the hundreds of millions of dollars from investors Naspers and U.S. fund Tiger Global Management.

So how did things turn out in West and Southern Africa? In 2014, the lead investor of a flailing Kalahari — Naspers — facilitated a merger with Takealot (that was more of an acquisition). They nixed the Kalahari brand in 2016 and bought out Takelot’s largest investor, Tiger Global, in 2018. Takealot is now South Africa’s leading e-commerce site by market share, but only operates in one country.

In Nigeria, by 2016 Jumia had outpaced its rival Konga in Alexa ratings (6 vs 14), while out-raising Konga (with backing of Goldman Sachs) to become Africa’s first VC backed, startup unicorn. By early 2018, Konga was purchased in a distressed acquisition and faded away as a competitor to Jumia.

Jumia went on to expand online goods and services verticals into 14 Africa countries (though it recently exited a few) and in April 2019 raised over $200 million in an NYSE IPO — the first on a major exchange for a VC-backed startup operating in Africa.

Jumia’s had bumpy road since going public — losing significant share-value after a short-sell attack earlier in 2019 — but the continent’s leading e-commerce company still has heap of capital and generates $100 million in revenues (even with losses).

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Airbnb’s New Year’s Eve guest volume shows its falling growth rate

Hello and welcome back to our regular morning look at private companies, public markets and the gray space in between. It’s finally 2020, the year that should bring us a direct listing from home-sharing giant Airbnb, a technology company valued at tens of billions of dollars. The company’s flotation will be a key event in…

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Airbnb’s New Year’s Eve guest volume shows its falling growth rate

Hello and welcome back to our regular morning look at private companies, public markets and the gray space in between.

It’s finally 2020, the year that should bring us a direct listing from home-sharing giant Airbnb, a technology company valued at tens of billions of dollars. The company’s flotation will be a key event in this coming year’s technology exit market. Expect the NYSE and Nasdaq to compete for the listing, bankers to queue to take part, and endless media coverage.

Given that that’s ahead, we’re going to take periodic looks at Airbnb as we tick closer to its eventual public market debut. And that means that this morning we’re looking back through time to see how fast the company has grown by using a quirky data point.

Airbnb releases a regular tally of its expected “guest stays” for New Year’s Eve each year, including 2019. We can therefore look back in time, tracking how quickly (or not) Airbnb’s New Year Eve guest tally has risen. This exercise will provide a loose, but fun proxy for the company’s growth as a whole.

The numbers

Before we look into the figures themselves, keep in mind that we are looking at a guest figure which is at best a proxy for revenue. We don’t know the revenue mix of the guest stays, for example, meaning that Airbnb could have seen a 10% drop in per-guest revenue this New Year’s Eve — even with more guest stays — and we’d have no idea.

So, the cliche about grains of salt and taking, please.

But as more guests tends to mean more rentals which points towards more revenue, the New Year’s Eve figures are useful as we work to understand how quickly Airbnb is growing now compared to how fast it grew in the past. The faster the company is expanding today, the more it’s worth. And given recent news that the company has ditched profitability in favor of boosting its sales and marketing spend (leading to sharp, regular deficits in its quarterly results), how fast Airbnb can grow through higher spend is a key question for the highly-backed, San Francisco-based private company.

Here’s the tally of guest stays in Airbnb’s during New Years Eve (data via CNBC, Jon Erlichman, Airbnb), and their resulting year-over-year growth rates:

  • 2009: 1,400
  • 2010: 6,000 (+329%)
  • 2011: 3,1000 (+417%)
  • 2012: 108,000 (248%)
  • 2013: 250,000 (+131%)
  • 2014: 540,000 (+116%)
  • 2015: 1,100,000 (+104%)
  • 2016: 2,000,000 (+82%)
  • 2017: 3,000,000 (+50%)
  • 2018: 3,700,000 (+23%)
  • 2019: 4,500,000 (+22%)

In chart form, that looks like this:

Let’s talk about a few things that stand out. First is that the company’s growth rate managed to stay over 100% for as long as it did. In case you’re a SaaS fan, what Airbnb pulled off in its early years (again, using this fun proxy for revenue growth) was far better than a triple-triple-double-double-double.

Next, the company’s growth rate in percentage terms has slowed dramatically, including in 2019. At the same time the firm managed to re-accelerate its gross guest growth in 2019. In numerical terms, Airbnb added 1,000,000 New Year’s Eve guest stays in 2017, 700,000 in 2018, and 800,000 in 2019. So 2019’s gross adds was not a record, but it was a better result than its year-ago tally.

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