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‘Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!’ Is a Surprisingly Thoughtful Approach to Traveling

This weekend, Netflix released the special mini-series, Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!, which sent the show’s beloved Fab Five across the globe to connect cultures and transform lives, per its trailer. It wasn’t clear what to expect from the first peek released last month, and skepticism seemed a reasonable response to the Fab Five wearing…

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‘Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!’ Is a Surprisingly Thoughtful Approach to Traveling

This weekend, Netflix released the special mini-series, Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!, which sent the show’s beloved Fab Five across the globe to connect cultures and transform lives, per its trailer. It wasn’t clear what to expect from the first peek released last month, and skepticism seemed a reasonable response to the Fab Five wearing martial arts uniforms and suddenly speaking Japanese. The show, however, is surprisingly smart and nuanced.

Taking an American show and plopping it into another culture is dicey territory. That’s even dicier given Queer Eye‘s premise of helping people change their lives; there’s potential there to flex feelings of cultural superiority by centering outsiders, and there’s the risk of deriding local culture through unfamiliar American stars. There was a chance it might seem like ignorant othering, or needless parachuting by clueless foreigners in the vein of Gordon Ramsay’s recent travel show. Overall, Queer Eye in Japan could have felt insensitive and even insulting.

But it didn’t, really. Over the course of its four episodes, We’re in Japan! took a sensitive approach to crossing cultures. By facilitating conversations and letting locals speak, the show treated the people and society that it was visiting with reverence and respect, and it broke from the stereotype of the self-centered American traveler. Instead of always speaking the loudest, When in Japan! proved that the Fab Five also know when to pass the mic, and the mini-season’s biggest strength is that it lets locals be the experts.

Aside from its setting, the most obvious change in When in Japan! is the addition of Japanese American model Kiko Mizuhara as a guide. Having grown up in Japan, Mizuhara is there not just to provide recommendations but also to explain Japanese customs and references, like the rebellious yankii clothing style followed by hero Kae in episode three. A local guide is the standard for travel television, but the inclusion of Mizuhara, one of Japan’s biggest models, is worth calling out for its smart cultural relevance for Japanese audiences.

Even before Mizuhara was involved, deferring to Japanese expertise started early in the production process, according to Jennifer Lane, Queer Eye‘s executive producer and showrunner. “I think that one of our best first decisions was in approaching a Japanese production company and making sure that our crew, our producers, were Japanese,” Lane told VICE. “If we can say how well we did in Japan, it’s because of our Japanese partners.” When it came to questions like whether or not it would be okay to bust into someone’s home with cameras, the team at Twenty First City “shepherded us every step of the way,” she said.

Guided by Mizuhara, the Fab Five actively asks about Japanese norms and practices instead of making assumptions or doing what they might do in the United States. Before meeting Yoko, the hero of episode one, they ask Mizuhara how to approach her. “Some cultural stuff,” Tan France asks as they sit down at dinner, “Do we hug her? Do we take our shoes off? What do we need to know?” Including that line is small but important since it acknowledges that what flies for the Fab Five in the rest of Queer Eye might not be the case in Japan.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re walking into a farmer’s house in Kansas City, Kansas or if you’re walking into someone’s house in Japan, we wanted to make sure that we did things as they dictated,” Lane said. “We really weren’t interested in bringing our Fab Five to Japan and pretending that by any stretch of the imagination they that they knew anything. It was so important for us to hear them talk to Kiko about the questions they might have about meeting someone and to hear how they were getting some of that information because we certainly didn’t want to come in with the idea that our Fab Five knew how to behave.”

That sense of respect for Japanese culture extends to language, both in terms of what is spoken and how things are spoken about. One episode includes a hero who sometimes speaks English, but the season’s other three heroes speak exclusively on the show in Japanese. The heroes don’t seem cherry-picked in favor of only English-speaking American viewers, which makes the show feel accessible both for people who speak English and people who speak Japanese. The conversations are mediated by an essential but invisible interpreter who allows both sides to speak their minds however they’re comfortable.

When it comes to discussing social issues with heroes, the Fab Five avoids making sweeping statements about Japan and it focuses instead on the individual experiences of each hero, without trying to generalize those either. “We have no pretense to say, ‘These represent all of Japan, and okay, we’re done.’ No, no, they just happened to be five unique stories and heroes who really appealed to us emotionally,” Lane said.

Queer Eye‘s entire conceit is that the Fab Five is made up of “experts,” each needed in order for the hero to better themself. Bobby Berk is the design expert; Karamo Brown is the culture expert; Tan France is the fashion expert; Antoni Porowski is the food and wine expert; and Jonathan Van Ness is the grooming expert. In Japan, however, the show is keenly aware of when to pass that expertise on to someone else. The mini-season feels a little different than the regular Queer Eye, and that’s a good thing because the context is different.

That’s most apparent in episode two in which the Fab Five comes to the aid of Kan, a young gay man who struggles with fully being himself. Instead of teaching Kan how to cook Japanese food, Antoni brings him to a restaurant where chef Yuji Takahashi guides him through making yakitori; when it comes to discussing the reality of being a gay man in Japan, Karamo defers to Japanese monk and makeup artist Kodo Nishimura instead of dominating the conversation himself. By connecting the show’s heroes with people who better understand the society in which they live, the Fab Five deftly facilitates important discussions and provides questions to keep them going, but with a refreshing approach to whose knowledge should be at the center.

“It’s like, yeah, you don’t come up into anyone’s face and pretend that you know how to be better than they are,” Lane said. “That’s not the point. Right? Our point isn’t to change people. Our point is to show people a new way. They have to do the changing.”

A more thoughtful approach to a travel show still doesn’t mean perfect, though, and there are certainly still things to question here. While Mizuhara guides the Fab Five, her authority has limits; the experiences and opinions she provides are those of just one person, just as Lane pointed out in terms of the mini-season’s four heroes. Plus, it remains troubling to exist in a media landscape in which not doing cultural caricatures or perpetuating American exceptionalism is something in need of praise.

But We’re in Japan! is an attempt at doing better, understanding what learning still needs to be done, and making the learning process a little more transparent. While we, as viewers in America, learn from its insights into self-love and self-reflection, what we can also glean from it is a model of being more conscious of our position in the world.



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The 9 Best Sex Toys to Give (or Receive) in 2019

In the midst of whatever holiday excitement you may be feeling (or not!), it’s good to also celebrate more intimate moments with a partner—or on your own. In the spirit of giving and receiving, I’ve rounded up my favorite sex toys of the year that can be enjoyed solo, with others, or both. Pick up…

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The 9 Best Sex Toys to Give (or Receive) in 2019

In the midst of whatever holiday excitement you may be feeling (or not!), it’s good to also celebrate more intimate moments with a partner—or on your own. In the spirit of giving and receiving, I’ve rounded up my favorite sex toys of the year that can be enjoyed solo, with others, or both. Pick up a gift that everyone will enjoy this season and well into the new year.

Fun Factory Manta stroker

manta stroker


The Manta is hands-down the most innovative new sex toy for people with penises, especially for boosting masturbation or receiving oral sex. The stroker’s tip is contoured to grip and encircle the shaft of a penis for a tailored massaging effect, and its lubricant-friendly ridges keep liquid contained to enhance the glide.

Aneros MGX Trident massager

aneros trident

This prostate massager is a necessity if you’re ready to explore deeper sensations for the first time (or whenever, really). The Aneros’ “T” shape fits your or your partners’ body with arms that sit along the perineum and an insertable stem for G-spot or prostate stimulation—which is amazing, because sex that accounts for the P-spot can unlock incredible orgasms, even surpassing those that come with straightforward ejaculation.

Unbound Bender vibrator

bender vibrator unbound


The updated rerelease of Unbound’s popular Bender vibrator is stronger, thicker, and better than ever. The new version features an improved battery life and a stronger motor. The durable seven and a half–inch toy is flexible enough to reach the deepest reaches of your or your partners’ G-spot areas, and it can be used flat or bent into a curved shape for internal and external pleasure—whatever you prefer, or, of course, both. It comes in two cute colors—mint green and quartz pink.

CalExotics Packer Gear stroker

packer gear stroker

This is the ideal toy for transgender men who are looking for a stroker specifically designed to maximize physical pleasure after taking T. The stroker grips and uses suction on your or your partners’ genitals. The toy offers maximum genital coverage designed to emulate squeezing and massaging along the lines of masturbation, and it’s especially effective with a water-based lube.

Lelo TOR 2 ring

lelo tor

$115 (on sale, usually $139); Lelo

This sophisticated cock ring is a stellar companion toy to elevate the sensations of penetrative sex for everyone involved. It’s designed to fit over a dildo, strap-on, or bio penis, making it a great gift for people interested in changing things up without having to learn all new moves or techniques. Its six pleasure settings range from soft vibrations to intense pulsation to benefit both the TOR’s wearer and their partners.

Maude vibrator

maude vibrator

Maude’s personal massager is discreet, silky in texture, water-resistant, and aesthetically pleasing. Given its unique shape—it looks kind of like an expensive cone-shaped paperweight in someone’s fancy office—this 100 percent silicone vibrator may have you wondering, How exactly does this work? The answer: exactly like most other vibrators, except stronger than most other vibrators, despite its innocent looks. This toy is especially recommended for travel (and even comes with a travel mode)—the TSA won’t know what it is, either. A note: This toy, for all its benefits, should not be used with silicone- or oil-based lubricants, which will degrade the silicone in the toy.

Womanizer touchless stimulator

womanizer

The Womanizer, which emulates oral stimulation with soft bursts of air against a person’s genitals (and especially their clitoris), has been rereleased on its five-year anniversary in a chic white design. A claw shape provides suction and massaging air waves to send targeted sensations directly to your or your partners’ most sensitive areas for touch-free pleasure. You can literally sit back and let this waterproof toy do all of the work.

b-Vibe Rimming Petite vibrator

b-vibe rimming petite

The slightly higher-tech toy Petite does double duty to simulate a rim job: Its vibrating head can be inserted anally for prostate or G-spot stimulation, and the rotating beads at the bottom sit against the nerve endings at the base of your or your partners’ anus. A remote control allows you or your partners to cycle between five different speeds/intensity levels as you go. Use a water-based lube with it—and feel free to take it into the bath or shower with you.

Doc Johnson Crystal Jellies double-ended dildo

jellie dildo

Twist, bend, suck—use this double-ended dildo any way that you see fit to enjoy double penetration alone or with your partners. This jelly toy is firm, but soft enough for safe, easy vaginal or anal entry, and its multi-textured 12 inches create wave after wave of excitement as you go—whether you’re sharing it with a partner, or one of you is taking it all for yourself.

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Lufthansa scraps 1,300 flights in 48-hour strike

Image copyright EPA Image caption The union has warned that further strikes could come “at any time” Lufthansa has cancelled 1,300 flights after it lost a last-minute legal bid to halt a strike by cabin crew.The two-day action over pay and conditions began at midnight local time. About 180,000 passengers are set to face travel…

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Lufthansa scraps 1,300 flights in 48-hour strike

Flight attendants take part in a demonstration at an airport in Munich, Germany,Image copyright
EPA

Image caption

The union has warned that further strikes could come “at any time”

Lufthansa has cancelled 1,300 flights after it lost a last-minute legal bid to halt a strike by cabin crew.

The two-day action over pay and conditions began at midnight local time. About 180,000 passengers are set to face travel disruption.

The UFO union said it would hit all Lufthansa flights from German airports.

Flights by Lufthansa’s other airlines including Eurowings, Swiss, Austrian Airlines, and Brussels Airlines are not affected, the airline said.

Lufthansa has cancelled 700 flights on Thursday and 600 on Friday, amounting to about one-fifth of its planned flights over the 48-hour period.

Image copyright
EPA

Image caption

Thousands of passengers are set to face disruption

It said it regretted the inconvenience caused, adding: “We will do everything we can to minimise the impact of this massive strike on our customers.”

On Wednesday, a Frankfurt labour court rejected Lufthansa’s application to prevent the strike, which is part of a long-running dispute at the airline.

Lufthansa has said passengers travelling between German airports can exchange their tickets online for rail tickets. Other passengers will be offered alternative flights.

The union’s vice-president, Daniel Flohr, has warned that further strikes could come “at any time”.

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‘I was kidnapped and now only travel by train’

Image caption Mannir Awal Addo refuses to travel by road after his kidnapping ordeal To avoid Nigeria’s notorious kidnapping gangs thousands of commuters pack on to trains each day between the capital, Abuja, and the city of Kaduna.Mannir Awal Addo, a trader in Abuja who has family that he visits every weekend in Kaduna, was…

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‘I was kidnapped and now only travel by train’

Mannir Awal Addo

Image caption

Mannir Awal Addo refuses to travel by road after his kidnapping ordeal

To avoid Nigeria’s notorious kidnapping gangs thousands of commuters pack on to trains each day between the capital, Abuja, and the city of Kaduna.

Mannir Awal Addo, a trader in Abuja who has family that he visits every weekend in Kaduna, was kidnapped on the Abuja-Kaduna highway earlier this year and held for five days.

He told the BBC that he paid his abductors $1,300 (£1,000) for his freedom: “It was a traumatic experience.”

He was affected by polio as a child and said he could not run away when kidnappers attacked the vehicle he was travelling in.

“Since then, honestly I don’t use car transport because I am afraid of the road. It’s better for me to take the train because of its safety.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Armed police officers accompany the six-carriage trains

By road the 150km (93-mile) journey between the two cities is cheaper and shorter, but it has become a matter of life and death as dozens of travellers are kidnapped along the highway – and many are killed.

When, thanks to a $500m Chinese loan, the train line linking Abuja to Kaduna opened in 2016 people used it more for its novelty value, given that most the country’s railway system is a relic from the colonial era.

Brawling for tickets

But now it is hard to get a ticket for the four round-trips made each day, with 5,000 commuters packing on to them daily.

The demand is high because nine armed police officers are on board guarding the train’s six carriages.

A one-way ticket is sold for about $4 for economy and $8 for business class – and there are usually long queues to get them.

Many passengers miss scheduled trips because of the huge demand. Many of the civil servants who work in the capital live in Kaduna.

In August, users posted images of stranded passengers brawling over tickets at a train station.

Officials have also been accused of hoarding tickets and selling them at inflated rates in a racketeering scheme, prompting the government to say it is considering automating the process.

Those who have tickets but cannot find seats have the option of standing for the two-hour journey for the same fee.

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When I joined 600 passengers on the 09:45 from Abuja, more than 50 were standing in my carriage.

Others were squeezed into the spaces between the carriages and by the toilets.

Image caption

Many are happy to find foot space to stand for the journey

It is a choice many are happy to make rather than use what has been dubbed Nigeria’s most dangerous road.

The highway is bordered on each side by thick rows of neem and baobab trees, providing excellent cover for the armed gangs hiding in wait.

Kidnappers in Nigeria are not fussy. They abduct both rich and poor, often collecting ransoms of up to $150,000 and as low as $20 – sometimes killing those whose families fail to pay.

Image caption

The passengers feel safer on the train than risk being attacked on the road

“At its height, the road had 10 kidnappings per day with 20 different groups operating on the route,” says police commander Abba Kyari, who heads a special unit fighting kidnappers.

The true figures are likely to be higher, as some families, like that of Mr Addo, choose not to report to officials, deciding to negotiate with the kidnappers directly.

Train passenger and postgraduate student Idris Mohammed, who used to travel by road to Kaduna for the weekends, is happy to pay more for his safety as “the roads are too dangerous now”.

Why don’t people live in Abuja?

For most of the civil servants who work in the capital annual rents as high as $15,000 are just too expensive.

Many live to the north in Kaduna, the commercial hub of northern Nigeria, where housing is cheaper. A cosmopolitan city, Kaduna is very different to Abuja, bristling with divergent interests, but with simmering tensions over ethnic, political and religious issues.

By contrast, Abuja is a slow-paced, administrative city. It became Nigeria’s capital in 1991 and has grown up from a small village to become home to many diplomats and foreign NGO workers. It was chosen as the capital because of its central location – which means that many people come from elsewhere in the country to work there, so on weekends it really empties out.

And its fairly well-heeled daily and weekly commuters are prime targets for kidnappers.

Bus stations suffering

But the popularity of the trains is bad news for buses.

Despite buses charging at least six times less than the trains, many of the big bus stations, which used to be bustling with passengers and luggage, are now empty.

An official from the transporters’ union told me the safety the trains could provide was the main reason.

Many of those who still use the road do so in private cars and set off at mid-morning or early afternoon.

Image copyright
Nigeria Police

Image caption

The Abuja-Kaduna highway is now travelled by only a brave few

Those who travel later place their faith in the several police check-points along the road to try to deter kidnappers.

Though the police have recorded a few successes against the kidnappers, including the 2017 arrest in south-west Lagos of an alleged kidnap kingpin, some people still question the seriousness of security agencies in tackling the problem.

Image caption

The Rigasa station in Kaduna is the final terminal point for the Abuja train

For now the train is a welcome haven – and the only recent security issue has been over cattle.

In September last year, the armed police escorts fired live rounds into the air to disperse villagers on the outskirts of Kaduna who had gathered to attack a train after 50 cows were crushed crossing the track.

The train journeys have also become a meeting point for Nigeria’s rich and poor and they sometimes bring together those from feuding communities – now all fleeing one common enemy, kidnappers.

When my train finally arrived at Rigasa station in Kaduna, some passengers raised their arms and murmured a prayer: they had lived to die another day.

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