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She Rewrote the History of American Cooking

https://www.tastecooking.com/interview-with-toni-tipton-martin-jubilee/

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Toni Tipton-Martin has made it her life’s work to reframe Aunt Jemima, the iconic, reductive pancake figure that has represented black womanhood in American cooking since the late 1930s. Over the course of 30-plus years, the Los Angeles–born journalist and food editor compiled more than 150 black-authored cookbooks spanning over 200 years in pursuit of overturning the prevailing story line that white chefs and home cooks are the sole heroes of American gastronomy.

It’s strange to suggest that there was a time when black chefs were considered to be without agency or authority when considering What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking (1881)—originally thought to be the first book authored by a black cook—or A Domestic Cookbook by Malinda Russell (1866), later proven as the original text. Tipton-Martin’s mission to simply collect such texts functions as self-evident proof of black excellence in early American cooking, but when she published The Jemima Code in 2015, she redefined the history not only of black foodways but of American foodways at large. Now, with her follow-up, Jubilee, she’s translated the food of the Code with historical recipes adapted for a modern-day kitchen.

The first time I encountered Tipton-Martin was in late 2009, when she began posting to The Jemima Code, a blog where she first compiled the stories of black figures that had been left out of the dominant narrative of American food culture. As a young chef and the recent founder of the site Black Culinary History, I was hungry for these kinds of stories. The Jemima Code, with its Tiffany-blue background and defiant red kerchief—a direct challenge to the marginalized narrative of Aunt Jemima—stunned me. Here was a woman who had worked under Ruth Reichl at the Los Angeles Times and become the first African American woman to hold the post of food editor of a major daily paper, at the Cleveland Plain Dealer, a woman who seemed to wholly understand and embrace the power of acknowledging black culinary receipts. With her bold proposal, Tipton-Martin shifted the center of the food universe to a cast of largely unknown names that, until the late 1970s, had quietly represented the base of working culinary professionals.

Jubilee was always meant to be a companion piece, celebrating and bringing to life the food of the people featured in The Jemima Code. From French-Caribbean quick breads, fritters, and rolls to African-influenced gumbo and groundnut stew, these recipes stand as a record of the bloodlines borne out within black culinary tradition. With The Jemima Code, we learned about not only Leah Chase and Edna Lewis, but Liza Ashley, the Arkansas Governor’s Mansion chef who charmed the state’s first families with her chess pie, as well as Vera Beck, the Plain Dealer test kitchen chef whom Julia Child and James Beard sought out for her biscuits recipe. Now, Jubilee exhumes their work from the archives and ushers it to the fore. With it, Tipton-Martin has given us the gift of a clear view of the generosity of the black hands that have flavored and shaped American cuisine for over two centuries.

Back in August, I sat down with Tipton-Martin to talk about her process, the times that Jubilee will live in, and the necessity of reframing marginalized narratives.

[This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.]

Your career seems to have always been leading you to this space of culinary history, which is historically a white women’s field. It’s also coincided in many ways with the beginning of this modern era of food media. I’m wondering about how the initial mission of the collection and your approach to the scholarship changed with the zeitgeist?

I’ve always approached this project as a journalist on the hunt for a story. As far back as my days with the Los Angeles Times, I was reporting stories that addressed our community’s relationship with food from a health and nutrition point of view, but I was always curious about the people and the stories I couldn’t tell through that lens. I remember when Ruth [Reichl] came to the Times and asked me about my frustration with this framework. It was like being set free to write in a completely new way. She charged me to dig deeper and tell the stories I was interested in without a blueprint. I left the newsroom that day, and it took me three days to come back with my first story. I waited on pins and needles for her reaction.

The resulting story was the beginning of a paradigm shift for me personally and for the industry at large. I think today, with media forms changing so rapidly, the stories are far more personal, allowing writers to infuse themselves into the narrative. The thing that will never change is that the most powerful stories center people. When I began to collect the cookbooks, it was really about these forgotten gems. I’d be gifted an obscure book or come across an out-of-print title in an antique store, and slowly, a story was being born that told a counternarrative about the foundation of American cuisine.

Toni Tipton Martin

I think of your work as wildly subversive, especially given the environment in which you began. To be one of the only black women navigating a mainly white food world—I’m wondering if you could talk a little about the vision it took to start building this canon of research before the zeitgeist was ready for it.

I had to convince a lot of people that there was power in these stories. I also had to convince them that I could present them without recipes. Very few people saw the vision, because our history is so hidden. It’s easy to dismiss or diminish these lives in the absence of written history, but we have to remember who had the power to record history. The journalist in me started with the source material. The books spoke to me and told me stories that were in direct contradiction to the tired tropes of deprivation and servitude. They showed such diverse lives and so much honor and joy that I knew I was onto something.

There were many discussions and versions of what the final book would become, but I’d always wanted to present these ancestors and the truth of their contributions to American cuisine in a way that would honor them. I’d hoped that it would resonate, and I knew the power of what I had, but no, I don’t think that at the time I really understood the way it would shift the conversation. It’s taken the subsequent years to form Jubilee into the project that it’s become, but The Jemima Code had to be first, to introduce the ancestors in archival form.

Once the reader consumes The Jemima Code and understands the 200-year timeline of black culinary history you’ve laid out, Jubilee becomes a tangible way for the reader to then cook the recipes. How did you approach the recipe writing with so much inspiration to draw from?

I’m not a chef, and although I write about food and cowrote A Taste of Heritage with Joe Randall, I wanted to develop the recipes from the point of view of the home cook who would hopefully want to integrate these deep culinary traditions into their everyday cooking. Our heritage is gracious and beautiful. I wanted to show how unique our culture is and to do so through the words and recipes of the ancestors. I want the reader to experience the food and traditions I grew up with that were full of pride and care—the attention to detail that a well-laid table expresses, and the flavor difference that preciously sourced produce brings to the dining experience.

I also had to make sure that, while the recipes read and tasted modern, it was clear that the inspirations were coming through the lens of the women and men of the code. The book is part African diaspora, part regional American, and all heritage, without compromising the source material.

Back in 2015, you hosted Soul Summit to commemorate the 150th anniversary of emancipation. At that event, noted journalist and food writer Lolis Eric Elie shared his manifesto on the notion of soul food as a starting point to define black foodways. In reading Jubilee’s recipes, it feels like you’ve unlocked a blueprint for these modern black foodways. What is your sense of the possibilities for black chefs in translating this wealth of culture into a modern culinary identity?

There is no one black identity. There is a shared culinary heritage that black hands have gifted this country, and I think the way that’s expressed today should be through personal narrative. I wrote the book and organized the chapters in the way I dine and entertain. I wanted to show how these traditions are expressed from my personal point of view growing up in California, having worked and lived across the country. I also wanted the recipes to reflect how cultural influence and regional specificity influence how we consume culture. There is cultural infusion that allows for unique or unexpected ingredient choices added to traditional dishes that is also part of the black migration story that I felt compelled to include.

You talk a lot about the choices you’ve made stylistically in both The Jemima Code and Jubilee. There is a presence and a beauty to both books that seems to be part of your own personal presentation and how you move through the world. Can you talk about the power of beauty?

So much of my work is about restoring dignity to our ancestors. So much of the narrative is about deficit and struggle, and I wanted my books to be beautiful as an homage to the power and beauty the books in the collection all showed me. These lives, these people of the code, deserve it. The Jemima Code was about showcasing the books themselves, so paper quality and the cover art were the focus. It’s a coffee-table book that is also a reference book, but it lives as an art piece. Jubilee, as a cookbook, had to be tactile. I wanted to be sure that I could bring to life these recipes in a way that translated as a usable manual but was still evocative and maintained the complexity.

The process was grueling, but in the end, the ancestors sent me Jerrelle Guy, who wrote the [James Beard] Award–nominated book Black Girl Baking. I knew I needed a team who understood recipes, could handle the food styling and photography, but would also have a love and respect for these foodways. I didn’t know I would find it all in one person, but once I spoke with Jerrelle and explained my vision, she was able to take the ball and run in a way that makes me so proud. Beauty is not a vice. It conveys the message that love and respect are being paid.

You live in Baltimore now. Can you talk about that move and what you have in store for this next phase of your career and the collection?

I’m restoring one of the “Painted Ladies” row houses in Charles Village, and the building is speaking to me. I feel the need to create a space for fellowship. I envision a hub for all of you to come and create and cook that really fosters the energy of the collection. I’m thinking about a home for The Jemima Code book collection and, for the immediate future, just waiting for the world to receive Jubilee.

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Perfect Chocolate Cheesecake with Oreo Crust

https://thestayathomechef.com/chocolate-cheesecake/

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This Chocolate Cheesecake recipe is smooth, rich, and full of chocolate flavor with an Oreo crust to take it over the top. It’s the perfect cheesecake for chocolate lovers!

Cheesecake. It says so much all on its own. Adding chocolate to the mix just takes that delectable dessert to the next level. This recipe uses an easy technique to make sure you get a rich, smooth cheesecake that is both decadent and delicious. Thanks to this amazing recipe, you don’t have to go out to get your dessert fix—you can make the perfect chocolate cheesecake from the comfort of your own home.

Oreo crust is the perfect touch to make this the best cheesecake ever! It’s up to you whether you want to share, but the finished product might just make you want to show off too.

Aluminum Foil Ice Bath Trick

This recipe uses a modified water bath trick to keep your oven nice and moist, but not risk any water leaking into your pan. Start by crumpling up 3 to 4 balls of aluminum foil into small balls. Place these onto a baking sheet and place your cheesecake on top, making any adjustments needed to the aluminum foil to keep your cheesecake level. Place an even layer of ice onto the baking sheet to surround the cheesecake. The ice melts while it is baking so there’s no risk of spilling as you transfer this into your oven. 

  • Why do I have to cool the cheesecake in the oven for so long?

    In order to create the perfect texture and smooth top, you will want to allow the full baking and cooling times in the oven, without opening the door. By cooling the cheesecake in the oven, without opening the door, the cheesecake continues to bake and then cools in a controlled environment. If you skip this step, you can “shock” the cheesecake and it could crack.

  • What kind of baking chocolate is best?

    This is not a chocolate bar or another kind of cocoa. Baking chocolate is sometimes called bitter chocolate and is a dark, unsweetened chocolate that is made specifically to be used as a raw ingredient in baking. Just be sure to use baking chocolate. Pro Tip: Add in the melted chocolate slowly. If you add it in too quickly, it will harden and can become clumpy instead of blending perfectly with the rest of the ingredients.

  • Why do I need to use a springform pan?

    A springform pan has a clasp on the side that allows it to expand outward and separate from the cheesecake in the ideal way—your cheesecake will retain its tall, flat form around the edge by using this kind of pan. It is possible to make the cheesecake in a deep dish pie pan, but you won’t be able to serve it in free form.

  • How do I keep my cheesecake from cracking?

    There are several tricks incorporated into this recipe to help prevent your cheesecake from cracking. Cracks do not impact the flavor in any way, but they do look funny. To keep your cheesecake from cracking:

    • Grease your springform pan really well. If your cheesecake sticks, it’ll pull the center and create a crack. 
    • Give your cheesecake a few taps on a countertop before baking to make sure the filling is settled into the pan with no bubbles.
    • Bake your cheesecake in a steam-filled oven to keep the moisture content high on the outside. Dry cheesecakes crack easier.
    • Do not open the oven door while baking! Allow the cheesecake to cool completely in the oven, without ever opening the oven door. Sudden exposure to major temperature differences may crack your cheesecake. 

If you are looking for great cheesecake recipes, we have your covered—check out this variety of delectable cheesecake treats:

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Chocolate Cheesecake on a white plate surrounded by oreos

Perfect Chocolate Cheesecake with Oreo Crust

This Chocolate Cheesecake recipe is smooth, rich, and full of chocolate flavor with an Oreo crust to take it over the top. It’s the perfect cheesecake for chocolate lovers!

Prep Time25 mins

Cook Time1 hr

Cooling Time6 hrs

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Servings: 12 slices

Ingredients

Oreo Crust

  • 24 oreos
  • 1/4 cup melted butter

Chocolate Cheesecake

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 4 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese softened
  • 4 ounces unsweetened baking chocolate melted
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease the sides and bottom of a 9-inch springform pan with butter or shortening.

  • Crush the Oreos in a food processor or blender until finely ground. Transfer to a mixing bowl. Stir in melted butter until the crumbs are all moistened and press into the bottom of the prepared springform pan.

  • In a large mixing bowl, stir together sugar, flour, unsweetened cocoa powder, and salt. Use a hand mixer (or stand mixer) to whip in the cream cheese until creamy and smooth.

  • Roughly chop the baking chocolate and place into a microwave safe bowl. Microwave in 15 second increments on high until melted, stirring in between.

  • Slowly add the melted chocolate to the cream cheese mixture while you mix until the chocolate is fully incorporated. Mix in eggs, sour cream, and vanilla extract. Beat on low until combined.

  • Pour mixture into the springform pan. Give the pan a few taps on the countertop to make sure any air bubbles have been removed and the filling is settled.

  • Crumple up 3 sheets of aluminum foil into flat discs and place on a baking sheet. Place the springform pan on top of these discs to elevate the cake so it doesn’t touch your baking sheet. Fill the baking sheet with a layer of ice, surrounding the springform pan, about 4 cups.

  • Bake in the center rack of the oven for 1 hour. Do not open the door. At the end of the hour, turn off the oven, keeping the door closed. Let the cheesecake slowly cool in the oven for 5 to 6 hours to prevent cracking. Remove and refrigerate until ready to serve.

  • Remove the springform pan ring before serving. Keep cold. Serve plain or topped with whipped cream or even drizzled with chocolate ganache or syrup.

Notes

Cheesecake should be refrigerated. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 674kcal | Carbohydrates: 63g | Protein: 11g | Fat: 46g | Saturated Fat: 25g | Cholesterol: 174mg | Sodium: 481mg | Potassium: 348mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 46g | Vitamin A: 1355IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 126mg | Iron: 5mg

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Keyword: Chocolate Cheesecake

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Most Amazing Red Velvet Cupcakes

https://thestayathomechef.com/red-velvet-cupcakes/

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The Most Amazing Red Velvet Cupcakes are moist, fluffy, and topped off with velvety ermine frosting for the perfect Red Velvet Cupcake you’ve been dreaming of!

Red velvet cupcake with ermine frosting with a bite taken out of it

Here it is, the recipe you have been looking for—red velvet cupcakes you will come back to every time you crave these babies! So delicious, tangy and moist, red velvet cake is a thing of its own. Some people think its chocolate cake with red coloring, but those who love red velvet know it is so much more.

Red velvet cake has hints of chocolate but is better known for its tangy, acidic flavor. It was originally made with beets, which added sweetness, flavor and tanginess, along with its signature red color. If you want to try making it that old fashioned way, here is a recipe for a Naturally Red Velvet Cake .

  • Isn’t red velvet cake just chocolate cake with red food coloring?

    Good question, and no. That is a common misconception. Red velvet cake does have some chocolate flavor to it, but it is also known for its slightly acidic or tangy flavor, which results from the buttermilk, vinegar, and either cream cheese or ermine frosting. In this recipe, we include the instructions for an ermine frosting that we love as a great balance to the tangy flavor of red velvet, but you can also use cream cheese frosting.

  • What kind of food foloring should I use?

    This recipe was made and tested using red liquid food coloring. You can also use gel food coloring or a natural red food coloring made from beets. You can find a wide variety of natural food dyes on Amazon.

  • What is ermine frosting?

    Ermine gets its name from the cute, weasel-like animal that has a white, fluffy coat. Ermine frosting is made of heated milk, sugar and flour and then whipped with butter. It is light and delicious, but not as tangy as cream cheese frosting. It will hold its shape better if it is refrigerated before and after icing. You can also use cream cheese frosting if you prefer it and like a little more tang on your red velvet cupcakes.

  • Is there a substitute for buttermilk?

    Buttermilk is a key component in this cake recipe. If you don’t have access to buttermilk, please use a buttermilk substitute. There are lots of options and you are sure to find one that you can make work in our article on buttermilk substitutes.

 

Check out these other recipes for more delicious cake and cupcake recipes:

Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Red Velvet Cupcakes with Ermine Icing on a wire cooling rack

Most Amazing Red Velvet Cupcakes

The Most Amazing Red Velvet Cupcakes are moist, fluffy, and topped off with velvety ermine frosting for the perfect Red Velvet Cupcake you’ve been dreaming of!

Prep Time15 mins

Cook Time22 mins

Frosting Cooling Time3 hrs

Total Time3 hrs 37 mins

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Servings: 24 cupcakes

Ingredients

Red Velvet Cupcakes

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (up to 1/4 cup)
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2/3 cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons red food coloring (1 fluid ounce)

Ermine Icing

  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • pinch salt
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups unsalted butter , cubed and softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

Red Velvet Cupcakes

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a muffin tin with cupcake liners. Recipe makes 24 cupcakes.

  • In a large mixing bowl, stir together flour, sugar, cornstarch, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

  • Add eggs, buttermilk, warm water, oil, vanilla, vinegar, and red food coloring. Use a hand mixer to beat on a medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl to make sure everything got mixed in.

  • Fill each cupcake liner 2/3 full.

  • Bake for 20-22 minutes until the cupcakes meet the toothpick test (stick a toothpick in and it comes out clean). Remove from tins and cool completely.

Ermine Icing

  • In a medium sauce pan, whisk together flour sugar, and salt over low heat. Cook for 2 minutes. Slowly whisk in milk and bring to a boil. Cook until thickened into a pudding-like consistency, about 1 minute, and then remove from heat. Pour into a bowl and place plastic wrap directly on top of the mixture so no skin forms. Set aside.

  • In a large bowl, use a hand mixer to whip butter until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add in cooked milk mixture 1 to 2 tablespoons at a time, mixing well between each addition. Once all milk mixture has been added in, beat in vanilla and continue beating until the frosting is thick and creamy and everything is well mixed in.

  • Frost completely cooled cupcakes.

Notes

COLOR NOTE: If you want a brighter red color, use only 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder. If you want a better flavor, use up to 1/4 cup. You’ll simply have much deeper brown notes to your red cake. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1cupcake | Calories: 369kcal | Carbohydrates: 45g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 20g | Saturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 70mg | Sodium: 221mg | Potassium: 92mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 35g | Vitamin A: 560IU | Calcium: 52mg | Iron: 1mg

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Keyword: Red Velvet Cupcakes

Red Velvet Cupcakes with Ermine Icing on a wire cooling rack

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30 Minute Chicken Tortilla Soup

https://thestayathomechef.com/chicken-tortilla-soup/

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This 30 Minute Chicken Tortilla Soup is delicious and easy to make. Tender chicken, black beans, and hearty Tex-Mex vegetables together in the perfect comfort food for busy chilly evenings.

Pot of chicken tortilla soup topped with cheese, avocado, tortilla strips, lime, and cilantro

Comfort food isn’t comfort food if you have to slave over a stove all day to make it. This soup is the best because it is so easy to make and comes together so quickly. It also happens to be ridiculously delicious.

We love having soup for dinner, so busy nights or chilly evenings are the perfect excuse for us to make this family favorite. It’s a great party food, or a handy and healthy family meal. Whatever your reason for wanting a great soup, you will love the warm flavors and hardiness of this comforting Tex-Mex treat!

  • Can this be made in a slow cooker?

    Yes. You can add all of the ingredients to the slow cooker except for the lime and cilantro. Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours or high for 3 to 4 hours. Shred the chicken and add lime juice and cilantro just before serving.

  • Can I make this soup in advance?

    Yes. This recipe freezes well. You will want to make the soup and not add the lime and cilantro. Allow the soup to cool completely and then store in an airtight container for up to three months. When ready to prepare this soup, thaw and heat either in a slow cooker or on the stove. Add the lime and cilantro just before serving.

  • How to make your own tortilla strips:

    Heat about a tablespoon of vegetable oil in a skillet on medium high heat. Once the oil is hot, add a corn or flour tortilla and fry for about 30 seconds and then flip it over, using tongs, and fry the other side until it is nice and crispy. Then, remove from the skillet and place on a cutting board. While it is still warm, you will cut it into strips using a regular knife or pizza cutter.

If you’re
craving soup, here are some other delicious recipes that
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Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

Bowl of chicken tortilla soup topped with cheese, avocado, tortilla strips, lime, and cilantro

30 Minute Chicken Tortilla Soup

This 30 Minute Chicken Tortilla Soup is delicious and easy to make. Tender chicken, black beans, and hearty Tex-Mex vegetables together in the perfect comfort food for busy chilly evenings.

Prep Time10 mins

Cook Time20 mins

Total Time30 mins

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Servings: 6 servings

Ingredients

Soup

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium white onion , diced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper , diced
  • 5 cloves garlic , minced
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 3 boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 15 ounce can tomato sauce (passata)
  • 15 ounce can fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 15 ounce can black beans
  • 7 ounce can diced green chiles
  • 1 1/2 cups frozen corn (or use canned)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup freshly chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup lime juice

For Serving

  • 3 cups tortilla strips or tortilla chips
  • 2 medium avocados , diced
  • 1 cup shredded Monterey jack cheese
  • 1/4 cup sour cream

Instructions

  • Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add in onion and bell pepper and saute 5 minutes. Add in garlic, chili powder, cumin, and paprika and toast for 60 seconds.

  • Pour in chicken broth, add in chicken breasts, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 15 to 20 minutes.

  • Remove cooked chicken from soup, shred with a fork, and return to the pot.

  • Pour in tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, black beans, green chiles, and corn. Return soup to a simmer and let simmer 5 minutes.

  • Turn off the heat and stir in cilantro and lime juice. Season with salt, to taste. Serve hot, topped with tortilla strips, diced avocado, cheese, and sour cream.

Notes

Slow Cooker Instructions:

You can add all of the ingredients to the slow cooker except for the lime and cilantro. Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours or high for 3 to 4 hours. Shred the chicken and add lime juice and cilantro just before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 516kcal | Carbohydrates: 45g | Protein: 26g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Cholesterol: 58mg | Sodium: 1743mg | Potassium: 1369mg | Fiber: 13g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 1685IU | Vitamin C: 68.3mg | Calcium: 245mg | Iron: 4.5mg

Course: Dinner, Main Course, Main Dish, Soup

Cuisine: American, TexMex

Keyword: Chicken Tortilla Soup

Bowl of chicken tortilla soup topped with cheese, avocado, tortilla strips, lime, and cilantro

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