Connect with us

Technology

Ten Facts About Electric Cars You’ve Been Getting Wrong

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/ten-facts-about-electric-cars-youve-been-getting-wrong_n_5dd2ca72e4b0d2e79f912b8f

Published

on

Deloitte estimates that the number of EVs sold worldwide per year will increase more than tenfold between 2018 and 2030. Already, nearly half the cars sold in Norway are EVs. That’s because many of the misconceptions fostered, in part, by early models with limited range and other drawbacks are rapidly being demolished by next-generation EVs.

EVs not only compete on equal footing with their internal combustion engine (ICE) counterparts but actually surpass them feature-by-feature.

1. Goodbye To Combustion

With no pistons, spark plugs, transmission, or any of the other components required to translate the force of exploding fuel to turning wheels, EVs have many fewer moving parts than ICE cars. That means they require a lot less maintenance.

Just for starters, EVs don’t need oil changes. And today’s batteries last as long as the cars themselves, providing trouble-free service for 100,000 miles and more.

2. Goodbye To Discomfort

No explosions under the hood make for more comfortable rides. Gone is the rumble of an engine, the shake and shimmy of vibrating parts spinning and whirling in a dance that must be perfectly coordinated for the car to move forward.

Instead, EV drivers and riders are treated to smooth, vibration-free forward motion at any speed, with only the faintest of whines from electric motors. In fact, manufacturers are now adding noise to their vehicles, to warn pedestrians, and maybe even reassure drivers that their cars are actually running.

3. Goodbye To Poor Acceleration

A quieter ride doesn’t mean an anemic one. Quite the opposite. Because electric power requires no transmission, electrons give motors full power instantly. Even otherwise unremarkable EVs can get faster acceleration off the line than some muscle cars powered by gasoline. That also translates into more power for passing and other quick maneuvers while already rolling.

4. Goodbye To No Connectivity

In some ways, EVs act more like the smartphones their drivers carry in their pockets than the ICE cars they may have previously had in their garages. Today’s EVs are electronic wonders, running all the latest apps in the dashboard.

The Polestar-2, for example, comes with a full suite of modern apps, including Google Play, Google Maps, and Google Assistant. And, as on a smartphone, the apps get updated regularly over an always-on internet connection.

5. Goodbye To Unsustainable

Most people understand that with no emissions coming out of the tailpipe, EVs are easier on the local environment. But some still hold on to the mistaken belief that EVs charging on a fossil-fuel-powered grid don’t deliver a net environmental gain.

However, research—for example, analysis from the European Commission—proves otherwise. The studies show EVs with a clear environmental advantage, wherever they’re charged, even taking into account emissions created during manufacture.

One reason: EVs are more efficient overall than their ICE counterparts, which brings us to the next point.

Polestar 2



Polestar 2

6. Goodbye To Non-Efficient

Electricity is a more efficient means of producing forward momentum. That’s because ICE-powered cars lose lots of energy to friction in the engine all the extra moving parts needed to get moving.

The batteries on board EVs also let them recover energy lost to braking. Regenerative braking slows the car by turning the motors into generators that feed energy back into the battery, giving the car more range.

7. Goodbye To Assumptions

Speaking of range, today’s EVs carry more than enough juice to get drivers where they need to go. The average driver in the United Kingdom, for example, travels only 18 miles a day. At that rate, an EV with a range of 200 miles can easily get a commuter through a week without having to recharge.

But thinking of range this way reflects ICE-centric driving. Most ICE car drivers think of gassing up as a necessary evil that they subject themselves as infrequently as possible. EV drivers have quite a different relationship to recharging.

8. Goodbye To Petrol

EV drivers can charge their cars at home, at work, and many other destinations. That gives their cars a much greater effective range than their charge indicators may imply at first glance. There’s no need to visit a filling station most of the time because even ordinary electrical outlets can fit the bill.

On long trips, EV drivers get much of the benefit of filling stations thanks to fast-charger stations that can get a car from a 10 percent charge to 80 percent in just half an hour.

9. Goodbye To Lack Of Choice

Like smartphones, EVs keep adding features with regular software updates. Their greater efficiency and large battery packs can also deliver more features that don’t require running an engine. Quick pre-heating via smartphone app, air-conditioned interiors for pets while parked, and even heated camping are all possible in EVs.

10. Goodbye To Boring Brands

With all the advanced features of EVs, car companies are inspired to innovate for the customer experience as well. How about showrooms that focus on the user experience instead of hard-sells by salespeople on commission? Or subscription driving that does away with sales altogether while adding many other benefits?

Say hello to the car saying goodbye to normal; the Polestar. Discover how sustainability, style and seamlessness is being combined in a brand new electric vehicle.

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Technology

Slack calls are having ‘connectivity issues’

Slack has confirmed that “Slack Calls are experiencing some connectivity difficulties right now.” The company said it is working to resolve the issue “as quickly as possible.” The difficulties coincide with the push from tech companies to move workers to remote-only meetings and conference calls, amid the outbreak of COVID-19. Slack did not comment on…

Published

on

Slack calls are having ‘connectivity issues’

Slack has confirmed that “Slack Calls are experiencing some connectivity difficulties right now.” The company said it is working to resolve the issue “as quickly as possible.” The difficulties coincide with the push from tech companies to move workers to remote-only meetings and conference calls, amid the outbreak of COVID-19.

Slack did not comment on any correlation between the two, or identify what factors are behind the connectivity issues.

Hey @SlackHQ @SlackStatus there’s definitely something up with calls. Everyone keeps getting randomly disconnected, but not all the way. Screen goes black and it just starts randomly playing connect and disconnect sounds.

— matt.js (@mattisadev) March 11, 2020

In a previous blog post outlining Slack’s response to COVID-19, it said “our system architecture is designed to automatically accommodate the surges of traffic throughout the day that this brings to our systems.” The company said its server capacity can handle the demands, as well as the various regions from which users may be logging in. Slack also outlined how the shift to remote may not add a crazy load to its systems.

“The demands on our infrastructure do not change when employees shift away from working together in the same office; there is no difference in load on our systems whether people are connecting from their office, a cellular network, or their homes.”

It added that employees already use an average of nine hours per day, so the volume remains the same.

Continue Reading

Technology

Establishing an emergency relief fund, Amazon commits to two-week pay for workers affected by COVID-19

Amazon has instituted a new policy which will see all Amazon employees diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine receiving up to two-weeks of pay. The additional pay is to “ensure employees have the time they need to return to good health without the worry of lost pay,” the company said in a statement. That…

Published

on

Establishing an emergency relief fund, Amazon commits to two-week pay for workers affected by COVID-19

Amazon has instituted a new policy which will see all Amazon employees diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine receiving up to two-weeks of pay.

The additional pay is to “ensure employees have the time they need to return to good health without the worry of lost pay,” the company said in a statement.

That pay is in addition to unlimited paid time off for all hourly employees through the end of March, which the company announced as a policy to its workers last week.

The company also said it was setting up a relief fund with a $25 million contribution to support delivery service partners and drivers along with Amazon Flex participants and seasonal employees.

“We will be offering all of these groups the ability to apply for grants approximately equal to up to two weeks of pay if diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine by the government or Amazon,” the company said.

The fund will also support employees and contractors who face financial hardships due to natural disasters, federal emergencies or personal hardship, the company said.

Amazon affiliated workers can apply to receive grant funding ranging from $400 to $5,000 per person.

With this initiative Amazon builds on the commitments it has made as one of several tech companies helping to financially support individuals impacted by the outbreak.

Uber, Salesforce, CiscoMicrosoftLyftSquareTwitterFacebook, Google, and Apple, have all made commitments to pay hourly and other contingent workers impacted the COVID-19 outbreak. Yesterday, Google announced that it had set up a COVID-19 fund as well.

“As we’re in a transition period in the U.S.—and to cover any gaps elsewhere in the world—Google is establishing a COVID-19 fund that will enable all our temporary staff and vendors, globally, to take paid sick leave if they have potential symptoms of COVID-19, or can’t come into work because they’re quarantined,” writes Adrienne Crowther, Google’s director of workplace services.

“Working with our partners, this fund will mean that members of our extended workforce will be compensated for their normal working hours if they can’t come into work for these reasons. We are carefully monitoring the situation and will continue to assess any adjustments needed over the coming months.”

In addition, Microsoft, Amazon and other Seattle-area companies are partnering with nonprofits and governments to launch a relief fund in response to the outbreak. Amazon and Microsoft committed $1 million apiece to this fund. Microsoft said it would also match employee donations to causes aiding in response to COVID-19.

Continue Reading

Technology

Superpeer raises $2M to help influencers and experts make money with one-on-one video calls

Superpeer is giving YouTube creators and other experts a new way to make money. The startup announced today that it has raised $2 million in pre-seed funding led by Eniac Ventures, with participation from angel investors including Steven Schlafman, Ankur Nagpal, Julia Lipton, Patrick Finnegan, Justin De Guzman, Chris Lu, Paul Yacoubian and Cheryl Sew…

Published

on

Superpeer raises $2M to help influencers and experts make money with one-on-one video calls

Superpeer is giving YouTube creators and other experts a new way to make money.

The startup announced today that it has raised $2 million in pre-seed funding led by Eniac Ventures, with participation from angel investors including Steven Schlafman, Ankur Nagpal, Julia Lipton, Patrick Finnegan, Justin De Guzman, Chris Lu, Paul Yacoubian and Cheryl Sew Hoy. It also launched on ProductHunt.

The idea is that if you’re watching a video to learn how to paint, or how to code, or about whatever the topic might be, there’s a good chance you have follow-up questions — maybe a lot of them. Ditto if you follow someone on Twitter, or read their blog posts, to learn more about a specific subject.

Now you could try to submit a question or two via tweet or comment section, but you’re probably not going to get any in-depth interaction — and that’s if they respond. You could also try to schedule a “Can I pick your brain?”-type coffee meeting, but again, the odds aren’t in your favor, particularly when it comes to picking the brain of someone famous or highly in-demand.

With Superpeer, experts who are interested in sharing their knowledge can do so via remote, one-on-one video calls. They upload an intro video, the times that they want to be available for calls and how much they want to charge for their time. Then Superpeer handles the appointments (integrating directly with the expert’s calendar), the calls and the payments, adding a 15% fee on top.

So a YouTube creator could start adding a message at the end of their videos directing fans who want to learn more to their Superpeer page. And if you’re a founder who wants to talk to an experienced designer, executive coach, product manager, marketing/sales expert, VC or other founder, you could start with this list.

Of course, there might be some wariness on both sides, whether you’re an expert who doesn’t want to get stuck on the phone with someone creepy or annoying, or someone who doesn’t want to pay for a call that turns out to be a complete waste of time.

To address this, co-founder and CEO Devrim Yasar (who previously founded collaborative programming startup Koding) said the company has created a user rating system, as well as a way to ask for a refund if you feel that a call violated the terms of service — the calls will be recorded and stored for 48 hours for this purpose.

Superpeer launched in private beta two weeks ago, and Yasar said the startup already has more than 100 Superpeers signed up.

Continue Reading

Recent Posts